Leadership on Point

How Many Hats Does a CIO Need to Wear?

October 21, 2016 Joe Wolke

Technology leaders earn their keep when they help their organizations use technology as a competitive advantage. Success is no longer measured just in availability, speed and uptime: one must now add resiliency, security, scalability, affordability and, most of all, the flexibility to meet business needs that have yet to be defined. These leaders must understand differentiators in their businesses; they need to know real capabilities in the IT marketplace as well as the best providers of those capabilities; and they need to know how to staff and manage high-performing teams who can assure consistent and reliable delivery of those services. They need to be:

  • Technology specialists who know and understand what is real and what is hype
  • Authorities in security, protecting the information that drives the company as well as meeting regulatory compliance
  • Team leaders able to attract, manage and retain a team of highly skilled technical professionals
  • Salespersons, working with peers within an organization to create and sell the business cases that prove the investment in technology is the best use of a company’s money
  • Service brokers with the ability to source both commodity services and the business differentiators from providers both internal and across the globe.

No single university discipline, certification or job prepares individuals for what they need to be the best IT leaders for their organizations. There is no single source that can teach IT leaders to comfortably wear all the necessary hats at the same time.

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The Power of Pause

August 19, 2013 webmaster

The speaker thanked the MC for the introduction and launched into her presentation. We were still thinking of our lunchtime conversations, shuffling papers, checking cell phones and didn’t pay attention to the introduction or to the speaker’s first few sentences. She seemed unaware of that as she continued.

Only in the middle of her third sentence did most of us in the audience begin listening. Those crucial opening sentences were therefore lost. One can only imagine how much more compelling her presentation would have been had she captured our attention at the very start.

As an audience, we are often on automatic listening mode and need something to help us change gears. For most of us, our ears and brains actually welcome the signals that help us transition. We expect words, so when we get the unexpected, we sit up and notice.

In the theater, as the lights are dimmed, the audience collectively understands that moment to cease talking and focus on the stage. In a meeting, a lack of words can have the same effect.

So, give the audience the unexpected… and … STOP … before starting.

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Are You A Spectator In Your Own Life?

June 21, 2013 John Dowd Jr. - Guest Author

At 50 years old, I got maybe the best gift anyone could ever get… I got fired.

Of course, at the moment it didn’t seem like a gift.  After a wonderful 30-year broadcast career, I found myself at a new chapter in my life with a burning question: What next?

The next logical step that my “mind” told me was to get another radio manager job, which would have been my TENTH.  Don’t get me wrong, I’m very grateful to have had a wonderful career.  But, I felt that the meaning in my life was no longer there.  While I did my best to help others, the corporate world had me focused less on people and more on profits.

Should I get a new job and feel like I was a spectator of my life and not living it? Or should I stop and try to finish a book that I had started a few years before, on positive thinking and well-being?  How wonderful to think about this project of slowing down and doing something that brought true meaning into both my life and the lives of others.

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The Myth of Work/Life Balance

August 23, 2012 Richard Levin

I have come to a disappointing realization.  It is now 14 years since my colleagues and I published our much-talked-about book, Shared Purpose, whose premise was that employers, families, communities, governments, and schools must work together to address the work/family imbalance facing working parents.  At the time, we urged our readers not to view “work and family” as a women’s issue, but as a serious challenge we must collectively address as a society.

It is why I am so saddened to read Anne-Marie Slaughter’s article in The Atlantic: “Why Women Still Can’t Have it All”, whose conclusion is that society has reneged on its commitment to working moms and has continued to place the burden of “work/life balance” on women.  (Anne-Marie Slaughter is a professor of politics and international affairs at Princeton University, and the mother of two teenage boys. She served as the director of policy planning at the State Department from 2009 to 2011.)

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Lessons Learned At the Beach

July 23, 2012 Meghan Vincent

As most New Englanders can be found doing during the summer months, I was enjoying some sun at the beach last weekend when I witnessed an event, courtesy of a 7 year-old, that even senior executives could learn from.

I watched as the aforementioned boy finished removing his brand new shovel from its packaging and began feverishly digging in the sand.  In one swift motion, a giant shovelful of dry sand went flying into the air and… all over a nearby sunbather.

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The World of Recruiting Is Changing… Are You?

April 19, 2012 Meghan Vincent

When most people think of social networking, they think of sites like Facebook and Twitter – and how those sites help them to connect with friends, family and perfect strangers alike.  Often left out of the conversation is LinkedIn, a social site that is most often thought of as an online rolodex and an electronic resume combined into one.  What most professionals don’t realize, however, is that LinkedIn is the fastest growing public provider of recruiting services in the corporate sector.

The site’s greatest benefit – to both organizations and potential job candidates – is that it allows for recruiters to search through an entire database of active AND passive job candidates.  This means that companies are no longer limited to sifting through the applications of those who found the job post enticing.  Instead, they can search the profile of every LinkedIn user (about 150 million) for the keywords and specific qualifications that they feel to be most important.

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This Holiday Season, Remember: Customer Loyalty Is A Two-Way Relationship

November 28, 2011 Richard Levin

The holidays are upon us and that means opportunities for retailers to develop loyalty among its customers.  The first step?  Make it easy!  Customers are busy and want to accomplish what they set out to do… without any unnecessary obstacles.  Impressing customers now could likely lead to loyalty throughout the year.

 

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Where Is Your Business Going?

November 17, 2011 Dr. Johnny Magwood - Guest Author

Business Improvement Process + Organizational Direction + Knowledge Management

Mission and vision provide employees with a picture of where their organization is headed and is part of a bigger  value system.  This value system provides direction for how the organization will respond to the overall business landscape and how the business will position itself among its competitors.  The discerning leader uses environmental and competitive analyses to create an exciting and ideal vision of the future or to redefine a new direction for the organization (Nanus, 1992).  Creating a picture of the future, persuading the board of directors and motivating employees are key elements to executing a rigorous strategic plan with multiple tactical elements.  Such a vision gives followers something bigger than themselves to believe in and a clear, values-based direction to follow.

 

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Let’s Celebrate – Another Female Corporate Executive – CEO!

November 3, 2011 Dr. Johnny Magwood - Guest Author

Women CEOs, Leadership, Women, CEO

Although the pay gap has shrunk, women are virtually absent from executive positions.  Corporations and society, in general, have numerous causes from such misrepresentation; the cuprites most sighted are stereotyping, misperceptions about leadership skills, cultural constraints, and the perceived inability for women to make tough managerial decisions. Moreover, women executives are observed having minimal networking groups and opportunities and are often not accepted in male dominate circles.  But IBM has a different opinion; the October 26, 2011, WSJ revealed that after 30 years of impeccable service, Virginia M. Rometty was given the top position of one of the world’s largest and well know corporation.  Rometty now shares corporate prominence with Hewlett-Packard’s CEO, Meg Whitman – how nice!  In the United Kingdom, executive women are also making a difference; their presences in the board rooms and at higher leadership levels show exceptional performance relative to Total Shareholder Return.  Yet, overall, executive and working women are still exposed to discrimination, stereotyping, the glass ceiling, and an expectation to conform to cultural norms and values.

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Critical Thinking and Deconstruction of Leadership Assumptions (Part II)

October 21, 2011 Dr. Johnny Magwood - Guest Author

Example of Executive Leadership’s Politics at Work

Understanding executive politics is vital for personal career success and downright survival.  If we would carefully observe and examine the dynamics of our executive team, we would discover that they are accomplished individuals who apply their skills and talents to advance the business – everyday.  One useful method relative to navigating the C-Suite environment is to have an astute understanding of self and how you are perceived by your peers.  Your boss is essentially interested in your performance, stellar interpersonal skills, and how well you interact with peers; those who possess strong personalities, in a demanding business environment.  As we reflect on executive decision quality, however, we may conclude that our decisions are fundamentally good.  However, let me share an example of poor decision quality vis-à-vis a specific company’s rollout of a new market based compensation program, which generated a social shock to and within this particular company.

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