Leadership on Point

Are You A Spectator In Your Own Life?

June 21, 2013 John Dowd Jr. - Guest Author

At 50 years old, I got maybe the best gift anyone could ever get… I got fired.

Of course, at the moment it didn’t seem like a gift.  After a wonderful 30-year broadcast career, I found myself at a new chapter in my life with a burning question: What next?

The next logical step that my “mind” told me was to get another radio manager job, which would have been my TENTH.  Don’t get me wrong, I’m very grateful to have had a wonderful career.  But, I felt that the meaning in my life was no longer there.  While I did my best to help others, the corporate world had me focused less on people and more on profits.

Should I get a new job and feel like I was a spectator of my life and not living it? Or should I stop and try to finish a book that I had started a few years before, on positive thinking and well-being?  How wonderful to think about this project of slowing down and doing something that brought true meaning into both my life and the lives of others.

(more…)

Read More +

Mentoring As An Act of Freeing

June 4, 2013 Chip Bell - Guest Author

“Do you give the horse his strength or clothe his neck with a flowing mane?  Do you make him leap like a locust, striking terror with his proud snorting?   He laughs at fear, afraid of nothing; he does not shy away from the sword.  In frenzied excitement he eats up the ground; he cannot stand still when the trumpet sounds.”

These powerful words from Job: 39 open the movie Secretariat, a film about the greatest horse that ever lived.  Not only did Secretariat (real name: Big Red) win the Triple Crown, he won all the three races in record time that all stand today, almost 40 years later. The storyline of the movie was about owner, Penny Chenery Tweedy, insisting his trainer and jockey let Secretariat run his own race–that is, with minimum supervision.

What if mentoring was all about removing, not about adding?  What if mentors believed their protégé was like a prize “race horse” that only needed the permission, proficiency, and protection to achieve greatness?  What if mentors worked as hard to get out of the way as they did to control and direct?

Had Secretariat trainer Lucien Laurin or jockey Ron Turcotte decided they needed to dictate, direct and domesticate Secretariat we might never have gotten to witness his “frenzied excitement to eat up the ground” as he ran the race he was meant to run.  Set your protégé free and let him or her “learn like the wind.”

 

Chip R. Bell is a customer loyalty consultant and the author of several best-selling books.  His newest book (with best-selling author Marshall Goldsmith) is Managers as Mentors:  Building Partnerships for Learning.  He can be reached at www.chipbell.com.  The book can be ordered http://amzn.to/1aqsUf3.

Read More +